Algeria 2, March 20, 2018

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ORAN Sub-Saharans face an uncertain future

Algeria plans to set up an additional $ 40 billion in financial support for the repatriation of sub-Saharans.

No fewer than 300 sub-Saharan immigrants were gathered at the end of the day last Saturday in the Bir El Djir transit center to return them to the southern borders to repatriate them to their motherland, Niger. Such an operation necessitated the mobilization of social services, security corps and volunteers from the Algerian Red Crescent. Such a measure falls within the framework of the implementation of the convention ratified by Algeria and Niger. According to Algerian Red Crescent officials in Oran, all the necessary conditions have been met to bring the operation to a successful conclusion, starting with the establishment of a medical staff to accompany Sub-Saharan immigrants to grouping center of the wilaya of Tamanrasset. Such an operation does not is not first of its kind. Like many other cities, Oran is also concerned by the implementation of the agreement ratified by Algeria and Niger.

How to deal with the ... street?
Contrary to the reports of the mistreatment of these illegal immigrants, Algeria pays particular attention by taking care of these people who have left their country to settle in Algeria while they can continue their journey towards 'Eldorado uncertain, Europe. Their repatriation certainly poses no great problem, but has necessitated the mobilization of colossal means, among which finance. Algeria has not, in this sense, observed any austerity policy in the context of the repatriation of these sub-Saharans. The global bill of treatment is stopped at not less than 1.2 billion dinars, equivalent to 120 billion centimes. Such an amount was put forward on the sidelines of a study day organized at the occasion of the International Day against Trafficking in Human Beings. The president of the Cndh revealed that Algeria has spent 80 billion centimes, between 2014 and 2016, by repatriating 6,000 children and 18,000 sub-Saharan women. 'This bill will be revised upward,' said the president of the National Council of Human Rights (NDH), Fafa Benzerrouki Sid Lakhdar. In this wake, Algeria intends to set up a financial extension of 40 billion additional dinars for the repatriation of sub-Saharans. Repatriation operations for sub-Saharan migrants are continuing. 'This bill will be revised upward,' said the president of the National Council of Human Rights (NDH), Fafa Benzerrouki Sid Lakhdar. In this wake, Algeria intends to set up a financial extension of 40 billion additional dinars for the repatriation of sub-Saharans. Repatriation operations for sub-Saharan migrants are continuing. 'This bill will be revised upward,' said the president of the National Council of Human Rights (NDH), Fafa Benzerrouki Sid Lakhdar. In this wake, Algeria intends to set up a financial extension of 40 billion additional dinars for the repatriation of sub-Saharans. Repatriation operations for sub-Saharan migrants are continuing.
If these Africans arrive in Algeria in large contingents, no one however thought about the fate that awaits them once rallied the national territory. The street is the only place that welcomes them to spend the icy nights under the rainy sky serving as their roof. It is no secret that these illegal immigrants who have fled misery find themselves in another acute indigence finding nothing better to do than to engage in begging, and never to act so repressed, criminality. This is at least their strong point in avoiding the wrath of policemen and gendarmes bitter in the fight against crime lambda. However, the 'threat' police is still in place, especially when it comes to the tracking of undocumented residents. Moreover, these are fewer and less noticeable in the street these last days. For good reason, a crazy rumor reports an unexpected police raid targeting mainly migrants from the region of Zinder in Niger. For immigrants of all nationalities, police make no distinction in their outings. However, these same policemen are instructed, even before their exits, to 'get their hands on', only and only on Nigeriens and immigrants staying illegally. The intox is raging in a city where racism, segregation and abuse are banned since the dawn of time, Oran. The Nigeriens, settled in Oran, in their majority belong to the Haoussa ethnic group. Their presence in Oran has been in great numbers since 2012. They did not come in the framework of

No human trafficking
Fleeing the malaise of their hometowns, these Hausa have, since their displacement in Algeria, in search of a better world that can change their destiny. As proof, they do not hesitate for a moment to get to work in construction sites. More than one, the lucky ones in particular, find refuge in places that do not look like safe or secure homes. These slums are offered to them by scavengers and 'real estate agents' of the circumstance at costs exceeding all the thresholds of the understanding. A small garage, both sordid and unhygienic, in the crowded neighborhood of El Hassi returns to the colossal sum of 50,000 dinars / month. The living conditions, if there are dwellings, are the least that can be said 'degrading' not answering any decent life for lack of
To pay such a monthly amount, those damned of the earth of the modern times are forced to combine their efforts to amass such a piggy bank while working hard. Despite all these shortcomings, these Nigerians, but especially the Malians, are often 'docile' abdicating, without complaint, provided they are kept out of sight exposing their intimacy and their family life, for fear of being caught in the nets of gendarmes raiding in search of undocumented migrants. Such a misadventure of these sub-Saharans did not leave inert those responsible for their diplomatic representations who asked Algeria to try to find a humanitarian solution, with the repatriation of women and children to Niger. Regarding the fight against trafficking in human beings, Algeria has always sought to enrich its legal arsenal to guard against this 'scourge totally foreign to its culture and society.' To this end, a special chapter was strengthened in the revised Criminal Code in 2009 and a national commission on the fight against trafficking in human beings was created in 2016. So far, no case has been reported. In short, these sub-Saharan Africans are facing an uncertain future as long as their fate continues to rock again despite all the measures taken. a special chapter was strengthened in the revised Criminal Code in 2009 and a national commission on the fight against trafficking in human beings was created in 2016. So far, no cases have been reported. In short, these sub-Saharan Africans are facing an uncertain future as long as their fate continues to rock again despite all the measures taken. a special chapter was strengthened in the revised Criminal Code in 2009 and a national commission on the fight against trafficking in human beings was created in 2016. So far, no cases have been reported. In short, these sub-Saharan Africans are facing an uncertain future as long as their fate continues to rock again despite all the measures taken.

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